Archive for Top Story

Last month, Raymond Davis, a CIA contract worker was released from a Pakistani prison after being charged with double homicide and spending nearly 3 months in captivity.  Though the US government argued that Davis should have been released because he was an embassy employee with diplomatic immunity, his release was ultimately brought about by a promise of monetary compensation. Alan Zhao and John McMinn looked into more on how diplomatic law and shari’a law interacted throughout this crisis.  Here’s John.


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Holding facility, U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 2002. US Navy photo.

Almost 10 years after the September 11th terrorist attacks, the US government has still not tried the men they say plotted the attack. Trials might start soon, but not in the way many expected. Sam Hirshman has more on the Obama Administration’s change in policy.


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U.S. Geological Survey geologist Mike Chornack scales a hillside during a site survey outside Sukalog, Afghanistan, in hopes of finding strong metallic minerals, which may result in mining jobs for Afghans. (U.S. Marine Corps photo)

A 2010 report by the US geological survey and the Pentagon reported that Afghanistan may contain nearly 1 trillion dollars worth of untapped mineral deposits.  This mineral wealth has the potential to transform the country, and foreign investors are eager to exploit this investment opportunity.  Caroline Batten has more on one specific country’s involvement – China.


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David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill visit Swarthmore. WNR Photo by Cristina Matamoras

In an exclusive two-part interview, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter David Rohde and his wife Kristen Mulvihill came to War News Radio to tell the story of his 2008 kidnapping at the hands of the Taliban, and to talk about the new book they wrote together: “A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides.” WNR’s Elliana Bisgarrd-Church reports.


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Gary Mortensen’s 2007 film, This is War: Memories of Iraq, was critically acclaimed for focusing on the soldiers’ perspectives. Director Mortensen’s new documentary, Shepherds of Helmand, uses this same approach to tell the story of a Oregonian National Guard unit deployed to Afghanistan in 2008. With producer Alan Zhao, Jared Nolan reports.


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Over the past few months a wave of protests has been sweeping across Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and many other Middle Eastern countries. Iraqis – who may have been inspired by their Arab neighbors – have intensified their demands for government reform, better public services and an end to government corruption. In Iraq’s northern region of Kurdistan several weeks of protests have been centered in Sulaimaniyah. Kyle Crawford spoke to blogger Karzan Kardozi and independent filmmaker San Saravan – who have been covering the protests since they began to learn more about what is happening.

You can visit Karzan Kardozi’s blog, The Moving Silent, here, or see filmaker San Saravan’s coverage of the protests at vimeo.

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